Composing

WHAT THE HECK IS AN “INTERPRETIVE” TEXT?

This word can trip you up in the Composing Section if you don’t know what it means.
 
Here's the sort of question you might get:  Inspired by this image, compose two brief interpretive texts that represent different perspectives.  (2017 WACE ATAR English exam)
 
An INTERPRETIVE TEXT is defined for you on the last page of your YEAR 12 SYLLABUS DOCUMENT as “texts whose primary purpose is to explain and interpret personalities, events, ideas, representations or concepts. They include autobiography, biography, media feature articles, documentary film and other non-fiction texts.”
 
Take last year's exam question from above.  If you rush right in and write a narrative, then... BUP-BUM!  That’s the buzzer noise for UH OH. You didn’t follow the instructions. 😨
 
Make sure you know what an INTERPRETIVE TEXT is.
 
The syllabus document also defines ANALYTICAL TEXTS, IMAGINATIVE TEXTS AND PERSUASIVE TEXTS.
 
You are probably more familiar with these types, but check ‘em out just in case.  They are on the last page of the glossary in your SYLLABUS document.
 
If you don’t know what the syllabus document is then you’d better click HERE QUICK SMART! 👍😉
Composing

The Composing Section, Step 2 – Deciding WHY to write? (PURPOSE)

Before you start to write, you’ve got to have a PURPOSE – a reason for writing (aside from the fact that your teacher is making you do it! 🤨)
 
The PURPOSE (your reason for writing) determines which LANGUAGE FEATURES and STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS you will use.
 
Look at these ones:
 
WRITING TO ENTERTAIN:
Use lots of descriptive and figurative language for a start, particularly in narrative writing. Humour, anecdotes and allusions will work well to entertain audiences in an article or speech too.
 
WRITING TO PERSUADE:
Use your persuasive language techniques (also called rhetorical devices), emotive and descriptive language, and try to appeal to reason, values or emotion.
 
WRITING TO INFORM OR EDUCATE:
Use your factual information, statistics, authorities, expert opinions etc to be convincing and believable.
 
As you can see, the purpose for writing dictates the type of language devices you will use. And you will be rewarded for knowing which ones to use when.  Watch this video - now this girl knows the art of being persuasive! 😎👍
NEXT POST: The Composing Section Step 3 – Who am I writing for? (AUDIENCE)